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Wild Foods Guide

I have put together this Wild Foods Guide to give you some ideas on what is possible with the Wild Food Challenge.

I am hoping that these lists will get you thinking and to help open your eyes to some truly wild and wonderful foods.  

I am keen for this guide to be a crowd-sourced resource, so if you have come across a food that’s not on this list, please leave me a comment below and I will continue to update.

 
There will certainly be some regional variability in foods that are found locally or in season, so use this as a rough guide to get you started.
When in doubt, if you go for food that is local & seasonal, grown in good soil or grown eating its natural diet, it’s hard to go wrong.

Don’t limit yourself to only the Wild Foods listed in this guide!
Instead, use it as a starting place to really get those creative juices going!

Seasonal Veggies

Some things to keep in mind when looking for high quality, micronutrient rich produce:

Best:  Local, organic & seasonal
Better:  Local & seasonal
Good:  Organic & seasonal
Baseline:  Supermarket produce

  • The most nutrient rich veggies and fruits will naturally be those that are fresh & grown locally.  Food starts to lose micronutrients from the moment it has been picked.
  • Organic is good, but not a deal breaker. If the organic food has been transported from elsewhere, chances are your locally grown, conventional foods are going to be more micronutrient rich.
  • Check out the Clean 15 & Dirty Dozen for more tips on what to get organic and what you can get away with conventionally grown.
  • Veggies that have been grown in good, nutrient rich soil with lots of compost and bio-matter will be more nutrient rich than hydroponic veggies.

As soon as a fruit or vegetable is harvested, the nutritional breakdown begins. Many vitamins present in the fruit or vegetable before harvest are highly unstable and are largely depleted after a few days.”  ~  Dallas & Melissa, Whole 9

Artichoke (Globe, Jerusalem)
Asian Greens (Amaranth, Bok Choy/Pak Choy, Choy Sum, Gai Laan, Tatsoi, Wombok)
Arugula (Rocket)
Asparagus (heirloom varieties include: White Asparagus, Purple Asparagus)
Avocado (varieties include: Hass, Fuerte, Reed, Wurtz)
Beans
Beetroot (heirloom varieties include: Chioggia, Burpee’s Golden, Bulls Blood)
Bok Choy / Pak Choy
Broccoli (varieties include: Romanesco, Raab, Purple Sprouting)
Broccolini
Broccoflower
Brussel Sprouts
Cabbage (varieties include: Red, White, Green)
Cactus Pads
Capsicum (varieties include: Red, Green, Yellow, Orange, Chocolate)
Carrot (heirloom varieties include: Dutch, Paris Market, Purple Dragon)
Cauliflower (varieties include: Green Macerata [Broccoflower], Purple of Sicily)
Celery
Cherimoyas
Choy Sum
Collard Greens
Cucumber
Dandelion Greens
Daikon Radish (also Black Daikon)
Endive
Fennel
Fiddlehead Ferns
Gai Laan
Jicama
Kale (varieties include: Black Tuscan, Curly Green Kale, Red Bor Kale)
Lambsquarters (Weed)
Lebanese Cucumber
Leek
Lettuce (varieties include: Butter, Chicory, Red Coral, Green Coral, Cos, Endive, Mignonette, Mizuna Red & Lime, Oakleaf, Radicchio, Rocket, Watercress)
Mizuna Greens (Red & Green)
Mushroom Varieties
Mustard Greens
Onion
Parsnip
Pomelo
Purslane (Weed)
Radish Varieties
Rainbow Chard Varieties
Rhubarb
Shallots
Silverbeet
Spinach
Squash (varieties include: Spaghetti Squash)
Snow Peas
Spring Onion
Sugar Snap Peas
Tatsoi
Tomato (heirloom varieties include: Cherry, Yellow/Cherry Yellow, Black Russian, Grosse Lisse, Roma, Black Krim, Tigerella)
Turnip
Watercress
Wombok
Zucchini

Asparagus (heirloom varieties include: White Asparagus, Purple Asparagus)
Avocado (varieties include: Hass, Fuerte, Reed, Wurtz)
Arugula (Rocket)
Beans
Beetroot (heirloom varieties include: Chioggia, Burpee’s Golden, Bulls Blood)
Bok Choy / Pak Choy
Burdock
Cabbage (varieties include: Red, White, Green)
Cactus Pads
Cactus Pears
Cardoon
Capsicum (varieties include: Red, Green, Yellow, Orange, Chocolate)
Carrot (heirloom varieties include: Dutch, Paris Market, Purple Dragon)
Celery
Celeriac
Chicory
Chilli
Cucumber
Daikon Radish (also Black Daikon)
Dandelion Greens
Eggplant Varieties
Endive
Kale (varieties include: Black Tuscan, Curly Green Kale, Red Bor Kale)
Lambsquarters (Weed)
Leek
Lettuce (varieties include: Butter, Chicory, Red Coral, Green Coral, Cos, Endive, Mignonette, Mizuna Red & Lime, Oakleaf, Radicchio, Rocket, Watercress)
Mizuna Greens (Red & Green)
Nettles
Okra
Onion
Purslane
Radish Varieties
Rainbow Chard Varieties
Silverbeet
Squash (varieties include: Spaghetti Squash)
Snow Peas
Spring Onion
Sugar Snap Peas
Swiss Chard
Tomato (heirloom varieties include: Cherry, Yellow/Cherry Yellow, Black Russian, Grosse Lisse, Roma, Black Krim, Tigerella)
Watercress
Zucchini
Zucchini flower

Artichoke (Jerusalem)
Asian greens (Amaranth, Bok Choy/Pak Choy, Choy Sum, Gai Laan, Sin Qua, Tatsoi, Wombok)
Avocado (varieties include: Hass, Fuerte, Reed, Wurtz)
Beans
Beetroot (heirloom varieties include: Chioggia, Burpee’s Golden, Bulls Blood)
Bok Choy / Pak Choy
Broccoli (varieties include: Romanesco, Raab, Purple Sprouting)
Broccolini
Broccoflower
Brussel sprouts
Cabbage (varieties include: Red, White, Green)
Cactus Pads
Cactus Pears
Capsicum (varieties include: Red, Green, Yellow, Orange, Chocolate)
Carrot (heirloom varieties include: Dutch, Paris Market, Purple Dragon)
Cauliflower (varieties include: Green Macerata [Broccoflower], Purple of Sicily)
Celery
Celeriac
Chard
Cherimoyas
Choko
Collard Greens
Chilli
Cucumber
Daikon Radish (also Black Daikon)
Eggplant Varieties
Fennel
Kale (varieties include: Black Tuscan, Curly Green Kale, Red Bor Kale)
Lambsquarters (Weed)
Leek
Lettuce (varieties include: Butter, Chicory, Red Coral, Green Coral, Cos, Endive, Mignonette, Mizuna Red & Lime, Oakleaf, Radicchio, Rocket, Watercress)
Mizuna Greens (Red & Green)
Mushrooms
Mustard Greens
Okra
Olives
Onion
Parsnip
Peas
Pumpkin Varieties
Radish
Radicchio
Rainbow Chard
Salsify
Silverbeet
Spinach
Spring Onion
Squash (varieties include: Spaghetti Squash, Acorn, Winter Squash, Buttercup, Butternut)
Swede
Sweet potato (including Gold, Kumara, Okinawan Purple)
Swiss Chard
Tatsoi
Tomato (heirloom varieties include: Cherry, Yellow/Cherry Yellow, Black Russian, Grosse Lisse, Roma, Black Krim, Tigerella)
Turnip
Witlof
Wombok
Zucchini

Asian greens (Amaranth, Bok Choy/Pak Choy, Choy Sum, Gai Laan, Sin Qua, Tatsoi, Wombok)
Avocado (varieties include: Hass, Fuerte, Reed, Wurtz)
Beetroot (Heirloom varieties include: Chioggia, Burpee’s Golden, Bulls Blood)
Bok Choy / Pak Choy
Broccoli (varieties include: Romanesco, Raab, Purple Sprouting)
Broccolini
Broccoflower
Brussel sprouts
Burdock
Cabbage (varieties include: Red, White, Green)
Carrot (heirloom varieties include: Dutch, Paris Market, Purple Dragon)
Cauliflower (varieties include: Green Macerata [Broccoflower], Purple of Sicily)
Celeriac
Celery
Chokos
Cherimoyas
Collard Greens
Endive
Fennel
Horseradish
Jicama
Kale (varieties include: Black Tuscan, Curly Green Kale, Red Bor Kale)
Kohlrabi (white & purple varieties)
Lambsquarters (Weed)
Leek
Lettuce (varieties include: Butter, Chicory, Red Coral, Green Coral, Cos, Endive, Mignonette, Mizuna Red & Lime, Oakleaf, Radicchio, Rocket, Watercress)
Mushrooms
Nettles
Okra
Olive
Onion
Parsnip
Pumpkin Varieties
Radish Varieties
Silverbeet
Spinach
Spring Onion
Snow Peas
Squash (Acorn Squash)
Swede
Sweet potato (including Gold, Kumara, Okinawan Purple)
Tatsoi
Turnip
Watercress
Wombok

Asian Greens (Bok Choy/Pak Choy, Choy Sum, Gai Laan)
Arugula (Rocket)
Beetroot (heirloom varieties include: Chioggia, Burpee’s Golden, Bulls Blood)
Bok Choy / Pak Choy
Cabbage 
(varieties include: Red, White, Green)
Carrot (heirloom varieties include: Dutch, Paris Market, Purple Dragon)
Celery
Leek
Lettuce (varieties include: Butter, Chicory, Red Coral, Green Coral, Cos, Endive, Mignonette, Mizuna Red & Lime, Oakleaf, Radicchio, Rocket)
Mushrooms

And everything else!
I am not sure on what the seasonal availability is of these veggies, but I didn’t want them to miss out!

Bitter Melon
Yuca (Cassava)

Lotus Root
Yam (including mountain yam, purple yam, white yam, yellow yam)
Taro
Occa (NZ Yam)
Sea Vegetables
Seaweed (Kelp, Dulse, Nori)

Sources: The Sustainable Table Seasonal Produce Guide, Whole 9 Seasonal Produce Guide, The Centre for Urban Education about Sustainable Agriculture (CUESA)

Seasonal Fruits

Some things to keep in mind when looking for high quality, micronutrient rich produce:

Best:  Local, organic & seasonal
Better:  Local & seasonal
Good:  Organic & seasonal
Baseline:  Supermarket produce

  • The most nutrient rich veggies and fruits will naturally be those that are fresh & grown locally.  Food starts to lose micronutrients from the moment it has been picked.
  • Organic is good, but not a deal breaker. If the organic food has been transported from elsewhere, chances are your locally grown, conventional foods are going to be more micronutrient rich.
  • Check out the Clean 15 & Dirty Dozen for more tips on what to get organic and what you can get away with conventionally grown.
  • Veggies and fruits that have been grown in good, nutrient rich soil with lots of compost and bio-matter will be more nutrient rich than hydroponic veggies.

As soon as a fruit or vegetable is harvested, the nutritional breakdown begins. Many vitamins present in the fruit or vegetable before harvest are highly unstable and are largely depleted after a few days.”  ~  Dallas & Melissa, Whole 9

Apple Varieties
Apricot
Avocado
(varieties include: Hass, Fuerte, Reed, Wurtz)
Banana
Blueberries
Cantaloupe (Rockmelon)
Cherry
Cumquat
Grapefruit
Honeydew
Kiwi fruit
(varieties include: Hayward, Zespri Gold, ENZARed)
Lemon
Lime
Loquat
Lychee
Mandarin
Mango
Mulberries
Orange Varieties
Papaya
Pepino
Pineapple
Rhubarb
Strawberry Varieties
Starfruit
Tangelo
Watermelon

Apple Varieties
Apricot
Banana
Blackberries
Blueberries
Boysenberries
Cantaloupe
Cherries
Currants
Dates
Elderberries
Figs
Grapefruit
Grapes
Honeydew
Lemon
Loganberries
Lychee
Mango
Mulberries
Nectarines
Orange
Passionfruit
Peach
Pear
Plum
Pineapple
Rambutan
Raspberries
Rhubarb
Rockmelon
Strawberry Varieties
Tamarillo
Watermelon

Avocado (varieties include: Hass, Fuerte, Reed, Wurtz)
Apple Varieties
Blackberries
Banana
Cumquat
Custard apples
Feijoa
Fig
Grapefruit
Grapes
Guava
Honeydew
Huckleberries
Kiwi fruit (varieties include: Hayward, Zespri Gold, ENZARed)
Lemons
Lime
Mandarin
Mango
Mangosteen
Nashi
Orange
Papaya
Passionfruit
Peach
Pear
Persimmon
Plum
Pomegranate
Prickly pear
Quince
Rambutan
Raspberries
Rhubarb
Rockmelon
Strawberry Varieties
Tamarillo

Apple Varieties
Avocado
Clementines
Cumquat
Custard apple
Dates
Feijoa
Grapefruit
Kiwi fruit
Lemon
Lime
Mandarin
Nashi
Orange
Pear
Persimmon
Pineapple
Pomegranate
Quince
Red Currants
Rhubarb
Tamarillo
Tangelo
Tangerines

Apples
Bananas
Lemons
Papayas 

Dragon Fruit
Durian
Longan
Mangosteen
Plantains
Snake Fruit

Sources: The Sustainable Table Seasonal Produce GuideWhole 9 Seasonal Produce Guide, The Centre for Urban Education about Sustainable Agriculture (CUESA)

Meat & Seafood

Some things to keep in mind when looking for high quality, micronutrient rich meats & seafood:

Beef & Lamb
Best: 100% Grass-fed & finished, pasture-raised, local
Better: Grass-fed
Good: Organic
Baseline: Commercial

Seafood
Best: Wild & sustainable
Better: Wild-caught & sustainable
Good: Humanely harvested, non-grain fed
Baseline: Farm-raised

Pork
Best: Pasture-raised, local
Better: Free-range, organic
Good: Organic
Baseline: Commercial

Eggs & Poultry
Best:  Local & Free range, pasture raised
Better:  Free range, organic
Good:  Cage Free, organic
Baseline:  Commercial

 

  • The most nutrient rich meats will be from animals that have themselves eaten their natural diet.
  • ‘Pastured’ refers to farmed animals that have been allowed to roam free and eat grass or allowed to scratch about for bugs & grubs (their natural diet).
  • Organic does not necessarily mean grass-fed, animals may have been given organic feed (grain or seed based feed)
  • Fish that is ‘wild-caught’ may have been spawned or spent part of their lives in a fish farm, but then released into the wild and eventually caught.
  • Use the Sustainable Seafood Guide (Australian) or the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch (US) to help you choose sustainable seafood

Beef (including veal, yearling, aged, wagyu)
Bison
Wild Boar
Buffalo
Camel
Chamois
Chicken (including Poussin [Spatchcock]eggs)
Crocodile
Duck (including eggs)
Elk
Emu
Goat
Goose (including eggs)
Guinea Fowl
Hare
Kangaroo
Lamb
Mutton
Mutton Bird

Ostrich (including eggs)
Pheasant (including eggs)
Pidgeon (including Squab)
Pork (including bacon, belly)
Quail (including eggs)
Rabbit
Turkey
Venison
Wallaby
Yak

Abalone (Paua)
Bream
Butterfish

Calamari
Catfish
Carp
Clams
Coral Trout

Crab
Crayfish

Cod
Grouper
Eel
Flathead
Flounder

Halibut
Herring
Geoduck Clam (“
gooey duck”)
King George Whiting
Leather Jacket
Lobster
Mackerel
Mahi Mahi
Moki

Moreton Bay Bugs
Mullet
Mussels
Octopus

Oysters (including Rock Oyster)
Salmon
Sardines
Shark

Scallops
Shrimp
Prawns
Sea Urchin (Kina)

Snails
Snapper
Squid
Swordfish
Trevally
Trout
Tuna
Yabbies (Marron)

Whiting
Whitebait 

Sources: Practical Paleo, Australia’s Sustainable Seafood Guide, plus supplier websites

Super Foods

  • Organ meats are some of the most nutrient dense parts of the animal and traditionally many cultures eat (or used to eat) “nose-to-tail”
  • Fermented foods will help to populate your gut with good bacteria that will improve your gut health and immunity.  There is some benefit to making fermented foods yourself as you be introducing microbes that come from your surrounding home environment.

Bones (marrow, knuckle, joints, neck, rib)
Liver (yearling beef, chicken, lambs fry)
Kidney
Heart
Thymus (Sweetbread)
Pancreas (Sweetbread)
Trotters (Pigs Feet)
Tongue
Snout
Tripe
Stomach (Haggis)
Cheek
Bone Marrow
Testicles
Feet
Neck

Sauerkraut (cabbage, carrot, seaweed, turnips, beets)
Kefir (water, milk, coconut)
Kombucha (Fermented Tea)
Kimchi (Korean Pickles: cabbage, radish, fruit)
Homemade Yoghurt (other dairy ferments: Kefir, Buttermilk, Sour Cream)
Fermented Veggies (carrot, sour beets, jerusalem artichokes, radish, pickles, garlic)
Kvass

Dulse
Kelp
Kombu

Nori
Sea Grapes
Sea Lettuce
Spirulina
Wakame 

Sources: Practical Paleo, Wild Fermentation, The Seaweed Site, & other various websites

Check out Chowstalker, Fast Paleo or The Foodee for some great Paleo recipes using these Wild Foods.
You can also jump in the Facebook Group and ask questions, post up a photo of your Wild Food and get ideas from what others are up to.

If you have come across a food that’s not on this list, please leave me a comment below and I will update the lists!

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  1. How to Substitute Your Weekly Staple Veggies For Something Different | Eat. Sleep. Move. - Saturday 29 September, 2012

    [...] If you’re thinking these substitutes are a little tame and are really wanting to take a “walk on the wild side” …check out the Wild Foods Guide. [...]

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